Precalculus A Fuctional Approach to Graphing and Problem Solving
Home


Section 4.4: Exponential Functions
Links (Click on the underlined link for extra practice with the topic.)

Squeeze Theorem of Exponents
This site illustrates this theorem (©1995-2001 Lawrence S. Husch and University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Mathematics Department. All rights reserved.):
Enter values for a and n to generate at table of values.  Then enter new values to "squeeze" the value for the exponential to any desired degree of accuracy.
http://archives.math.utk.edu/visual.calculus/0/exp_log.6/index.html

Graphing Exponential Functions
This site illustrates variations of exponential graphs (©1995-2001 Lawrence S. Husch and University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Mathematics Department. All rights reserved.):
http://archives.math.utk.edu/visual.calculus/0/shifting.8/index.html
Here is a applet to graph exponential functions:
http://www.analyzemath.com/expfunction/expfunction.html

Compound Interest Formulas
http://math2.org/math/general/interest.htm
Deriving the compound interest formula:
http://id.mind.net/~zona/mmts/functionInstitute/exponentialFunctions/compoundInterest.html

Continuous Interest
http://id.mind.net/~zona/mmts/functionInstitute/exponentialFunctions/continuousInterest.html

Visit the eHomepage
http://www.mu.org/~doug/exp/

Population Growth Data
http://www.mnforsustain.org/pop_world_population_1950-2050_and_graph.htm

Leonhard Euler
Even though Euler is featured elsewhere in the book, you might want to check out the person after whom the number e is named. (JOC/EFR © September 1998):
http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Biographies/Euler.html

< Back to Section 4


© 2011 Karl J. Smith. All rights reserved.